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Spotlight on… Kathryn Chatterton

17.05.18 Categories: News from the hospital, Staff stories,

If you’re a patient being treated for bladder cancer at Guy’s and St Thomas’, Kathryn Chatterton is someone you’re likely to recognise.

Kathryn works alongside the TOUR team and is an integral part of the bladder cancer clinical workforce. She takes on the vital task of supporting and educating patients throughout their cancer journey, from telephone calls to post-op ward visits; or arranging clinics and health and wellbeing events.

In Bladder Cancer Awareness Month, Kathryn tells us more about her role and what she loves about it.

What's the name of your role?

Bladder Cancer Clinical Nurse Specialist.

Which part of Guy’s and St Thomas’ do you work in?

The Urology Centre at Guy’s Hospital.

What does a typical day look like for you?

Prioritising patient emails and answering calls from the call centre throughout the day. Being available for new bladder cancer diagnosis from clinic. Popping up to the ward to ensure the bladder cancer inpatients are ok. One or two clinics either involving administrating intravesical chemotherapy (given as liquid into the bladder through a catheter) or immunotherapy to patients. Nurse-led flexible cystoscopy clinics, bladder cancer clinic and multidisciplinary team preparation.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

The diversity of it. Every day is different, from meeting new patients and being their point of contact, to reassuring and catching up with patients well known to the bladder cancer service.

Which part of your job is most challenging?

Patients progressing with their cancer and steering them through their journey.

What's your favourite thing about Guy’s and St Thomas’?

The team I work with – it makes me want to come to work.

What's your proudest achievement in your career to date?

Setting up the first ever nurse-led flexible cystoscopy service at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Australia in 2009, when I worked there for one year (A cystoscopy is a procedure to look inside the bladder using a thin camera called a cystoscope).

What do you like to do outside of work in your free time?

Free time’ is somewhat ‘busy time’ with both a two and four-year-old at home…say no more! But I wouldn’t have it any other way - Work Hard / Play Hard is my motto!

Can you name one thing that your patients might not know about you?

Ha! They know quite a lot about me, especially if I am giving them their intravesical chemotherapy – but I guess they wouldn’t know that when I was a child I got my head stuck between the railings of the Lincoln Castle Ferry in Hull!

If you could take only one thing to a desert island, what would it be? 

My family, I’d be lost without them!